Text Box: Telework

 

 

 


What we know about Telework:

 

Ž    Telework works!  While 14% of Virginia’s workforce is estimated to telework, over half would like to join in if their job position allowed. If financial incentives were offered, over one-third of top management of both small and large businesses would be willing to consider a formal telework program like the Telework!Va in northern Virginia.

 

Key Findings:

 

Ž    14% of the population of full- and part-time workers classified themselves as a “telecommuter.” This is based on wage and salary employees who work at home or at a location other than their central work place at least occasionally during normal work hours. Source: 2001 Fitzgerald & Holliday Telework Study.

 

Ž    Current teleworkers tend to be white-collar professionals. The current telework market skews to white males from high-income households who are predominately employed as sales workers, managers, and administrators. Source: 2001 Fitzgerald & Holliday Telework Study.

 

Ž    There is a large pent-up demand for teleworking. 48% of all adults in Virginia’s workforce are either currently teleworking (14%) or are interested in teleworking and feel teleworking is even possible in their current job (another 34%). This projected demand, however, is based only on commuters’ or employees’ desires. Source: 2001 Fitzgerald & Holliday Telework Study.

 

Ž    Teleworking may not work for everyone.  Interest in teleworking is particularly strong among those in lower and middle-income households who work for large private-sector companies in clerical jobs.  However, many realize their current job classification and function may not afford a telecommuting option. Source: 2001 Fitzgerald & Holliday Telework Study.

 

Ž    Employer support is correlated to employee participation in telework programs. Most (81%) of the existing teleworkers across Virginia (14% of the population) said they were in some sort of employer program, albeit a formal or informal  program. Source: 2001 Fitzgerald & Holliday Telework Study.

 

Ž    Few companies currently offer formal work commute assistance programs other than free parking (15%- Tidewater, 10% -Richmond).  Flex-time and telecommuting are the two most popular programs. Source: 2004 Telework!Va Tidewater and Richmond Studies.

 

Ž    The majority of employers that offer work commute programs feel they are most effective for recruitment and retention.  Source:  2004 Telework!Va Tidewater and Richmond Studies

 

 

Ž    While there are many reasons companies hesitate to offer telecommuting programs, their biggest concerns center around productivity and supervisory concerns. Most say it is hard to quantify a specific ROI. Source: 2004 Telework!Va Tidewater and Richmond Studies.

 

Ž    Employers, especially professional service firms, express interest in formal incentive-based telework programs. Over a third (38% and 37%) are interested in Telework!Va in Tidewater and Richmond, respectively. However, over half feel financial incentives are absolutely necessary to motivate companies to seriously consider implementing a telework program. Source: 2004 Telework!Va Tidewater and Richmond Studies.

 

 

Ž    The CEO or President is the primary decision maker when it comes to approving a formal telecommute program. Management and executives of both small and large businesses are equally interested in programs like Telework!Va. Source: 2004 Telework!Va Tidewater and Richmond Studies.

 

 

Related Studies/Documents:

2001:  Telework Study” (Fitzgerald & Holliday)

 

2004:  “Telework!Va - Tidewater Market Employer Study”

 

2004:  “Telework!Va - Richmond Market Employer Study”